The Catholic University of America

Undergraduate Programs in Education

Choosing a Program

Teacher Education Specializations:
Teacher Education is for those wishing to teach in a regular classroom setting.  All Teacher Education programs have been accredited by the National Council for Accreditation for Teacher Education (NCATE) and maintain state approval for licensure.

  • Early Childhood: for those interested in teaching young children (Pre-K - 3rd grade).
  • Elementary Education: for those interested in teaching in self-contained classrooms (grades 1-6).
  • Secondary Education: for those interested in teaching in a departmentalized classroom setting (grades 7-12).
    • joint programs are available in the areas of: English, History and Mathematics. These candidates should inform their academic adviser in order to receive the correct program of studies and should also consult with the coordinator of Secondary Education.

Education Studies: for those interested in teaching in a non-school setting.

 

Teacher Education
Accredited

General Information & Admittance

Overview

The emphasis in teacher education is on providing the candidate with the professional education coursework needed for state licensure in early childhood, elementary or secondary education. Each of these programs presents teaching as a reflective practice. By developing a reflective, problem-solving orientation toward education, graduates of these programs should be empowered to critically examine their own actions and the context of these actions for the purpose of a more deliberative mode of professional activity. The outcome should be self-directed teachers who use professional knowledge to actively, persistently and carefully improve their practice.

Special Skills

The teacher licensure program provides candidates with knowledge of the teaching and schooling processes including learning theory and teaching methodology, interpersonal skills required in the teaching/learning process, knowledge of curriculum theory and design based on individual assessments, competency in the development and use of instructional materials, and opportunities to apply theory through directed practicum experience.

Choosing a Program

The early childhood, elementary, and secondary education programs offer candidates the opportunity to acquire essential knowledge, skills and dispositions for beginning teachers. Candidates who plan to teach children in preschool, kindergarten, or grades one through three should major in early childhood education. Candidates who plan to teach grades one through six should major in elementary education. Candidates who plan to teach in a departmentalized setting in a middle, junior, or senior high school (grades 7-12) have a joint major in education and another Arts and Sciences department. Joint programs in secondary education are offered in the departments of English, history and mathematics. Consult the Department of Education and the department in which you wish to specialize for information about specific programs.

Details of the Program

The Catholic University of America is committed to a strong and vibrant teacher education program, not a teacher training program concerned solely with developing basic teaching skills. While we recognize the need for candidates to demonstrate a basic level of teaching competence, we view that achievement as only the beginning of their professional preparation. We are more concerned with the development of critical, reflective minds and in morally grounded, self-motivated action.

Philosophy & Conceptual Framework

The Department of Education, a scholarly community of faculty and students, shares in the general mission of the Catholic University of America.  It recognizes the important role of education in shaping humanity, the world and the future.  The teacher education program functions within this community to prepare teachers for Catholic, private and public schools who are prepared to educate students for a changing world.

The overall purpose of teacher education at CUA is to help candidates acquire the skills and reflective qualities essential for the professional practice of teaching.  By developing a reflective, problem-solving orientation toward teaching, graduates of this program should be empowered to critically examine their own actions and the context of these actions for the purpose of a more deliberative mode of professional activity (Berlak and Berlak, 1981).  The outcome should be self-directed teachers who use professional knowledge to actively, persistently and carefully improve their practice.

One assumption that guides this program is that pre-service teachers can be taught to reflect on their experiences.  This can only be accomplished when students are given many opportunities to practice reflection in different contexts and situations.  For the reason, all coursework and related field experiences are infused with content and assignments that promote the central goal of increasing reflective thought.

A second assumption is that systematic observation and analysis during a variety of field experiences will promote reflectivity.  Candidates are encouraged to use a problem-solving approach to reflect on situations encountered in their own teaching experiences or observations, draw on relevant research and theory for solutions, and integrate knowledge across coursework and field experiences.

Conceptual Framework

History of the Conceptual Framework

The unit's first conceptual framework was developed in 1989 to help university educators design consistent and coherent teacher education programs and to help candidates understand the deeper issues of social justice and equity embedded in the technical questions of day-to-day teaching.  The framework was built on the fundamental interrelationships between educational theories, meaningful interaction with P-12 students, and personal reflection throughout the teacher education assignments and field experiences starting at the beginning of each program and culminating as a capstone experience during the student teaching semester were planned around this philosophical approach to teacher education, requiring gradually richer understanding and application of the reflective framework.  By the end of each program the capstone experience included a large action research project based on research and current best practices and reflection as well as the standard 14-week student teaching duties.  One of the major goals was to help candidates infuse the technical aspects of teaching with moral considerations so that candidates would think beyond the "how to" of teaching to examine the goals, consequences, and values of their words and actions from multiple viewpoints.

The conceptual framework was revised in 2003 to facilitate candidates' understanding and use of the framework for more meaningful personal reflection and continues to serve as the cornerstone of education programs and as a guide to a moral approach to teacher preparation and learning.  The conceptual framework is infused in all courses and field experiences as an ongoing, iterative, and integrated process.  Its use is integrated in each teacher education program, course, and key assessment in a scaffolded, developmentally appropriate course of study.

The Components

Eight Elements of the Learning Environment

The unit's conceptual framework is seen as a mechanism to allow educators at all experience levels to move fluidly between philosophy, theory, practice, and personal reflection.  To accomplish this task, the framework introduces three components to guide reflections and decision making.  One component consists of the elements of the learning environment.  These elements are designed to help educators systematically analyze the complexities of each teaching and learning experience.  Originally based on Schwab's (1973) four commonplaces of teacher, student, content and context, the new model expands this notion to include eight elements:

  1. diversity of student needs
  2. the educator's personal educational beliefs
  3. stakeholders
  4. collaborative practice
  5. instructional strategies
  6. discipline knowledge
  7. assessment
  8. classroom structures

Candidates are guided through exercises that address these elements individually and then in concert.  Key features of this component include the role of the learner as the central figure in every teaching/learning experience and the interactive nature of the elements (for example, it is meaningless to consider assessment without considering the needs of the learner and the nature of the discipline knowledge being assessed, just as stakeholder expectations and personal beliefs shape the classroom structures used).  Echoing Bronfenbrenner's work (1989), candidates are expected to consider the learning environments as embedded within larger social structures as well.

It is tempting for educators, especially teacher education candidates, to focus on the day-to-day technical aspects of teaching.  At this level, all challenges are viewed as problems to be solved with whatever tools are currently available.  While it is important not to minimize the importance of these daily challenges that all educators face, the conceptual framework is designed to help educators move beyond the surface level of teacher-as-technician to see the larger systematic impact classroom practice has on individual students and society in general.

Global Perspective of Education

The second component of the reflective practitioner framework builds on the work of Berlak and Berlak (1981) to describe and define fundamental educational essential questions, or dilemmas, that lie under the surface of classroom challenges.  Reflective practitioners need to stop to consider how one's perspective on these key questions can both inform and limit the options that seem reasonable in a given situation.  Using this component of the framework, educators can explore a broader range of possible solutions for a given situation by recognizing that there are multiple, morally defensible positions.  This process helps candidates address two of the most challenging elements of the learning environment: the impact of their own philosophy on their classroom choices and the possibly competing needs and values of the other stakeholders in the learning community.  When considering options to best meet the needs of a curriculum (e.g., who decides what is worth knowing?), control (e.g., who sets the standards?) and society (e.g., what role should schools play in enculturation?) shape the strategies that seem reasonable.  Not only do these essential educational questions impact decisions on a practical level, they also help situate ongoing classroom concerns in larger philosophical questions.

Modes of Reflection

To continue that process of considering larger philosophical issues, the third component of the three-prong approach to reflective practice consists of an iterative reflective decision-making process.  Reflective practitioners must consider their decisions on three different levels (Van Mannen, 1977), or modes of reflection as CUA call them.  The philosophical mode prompts the educator to consider the role that education should play in society in general and in the life of the particular child.  Each decision should be examined for consistency and efficacy in supporting those larger goals.  The descriptive mode addresses the technical issues of how educational decisions are carried out.  Educators must strive to assess their own practice and to look for new methods for reflective practitioners to consider the explicit and hidden messages sent to students and all stakeholders by classroom decisions.  Are expectations uniformly high?  Are the knowledge, skills, and cultural traditions children bring to class valued or marginalized?  Are parents seed as partners or obstacles?  These types of questions move the reflective practitioner back to the larger philosophical questions to begin the process again.  While it does not matter if the initial question is descriptive, interpretive, or philosophical, the model prompts the educator to see the process as ongoing and interrelated.

The Important Documents page includes the CUA conceptual framework standards, training materials as well as a matrix that aligns all standards from specialized professional associations and the CUA vision and mission.

 

General Program Description

A program of studies in education has the same general structure as other programs at The Catholic University of America.  The program includes the basic general education and professional courses required by the certifying authorities of most states.  It is designed to provide candidates with opportunities for study in the liberal arts and sciences, educational foundations and teaching-learning theories with internship experiences during a four-year sequence.  Attention is also given to curricular and instructional strategies for exceptional students and students in varied cultural settings, as well as to an increased demand for computer literacy.

The early childhood, elementary and secondary education areas offer candidates the opportunity to acquire essential knowledge and skills for beginning teachers.  Candidates who plan to work primarily with young children in educational settings should major in early childhood education (Grades Pre-K-3).  Candidates who plan to teach in a self-contained classroom (Grades 1-6) should major in elementary education.  Candidates who plan to teach in a departmentalized setting (Grades 7-12) in a middle, junior or senior high school should have a joint major in secondary education and another Arts and Sciences department.  Joint programs in secondary education are offered in the departments of English, History and Mathematics.  Candidates should consult with an academic advisor in that particular department and the Department of Education for the appropriate program of studies.

The B.A. concentration in early childhood and elementary education and the secondary sub-concentration in education provide coursework leading to state teaching licensure.  Candidates may also pursue teaching licensure in music education.  (See the School of Music for further information).  All graduates who wish to obtain a teaching license should apply to the District of Columbia Board of Education.  According to DC's reciprocity agreement with 43 states, CUA graduates are eligible for obtaining a teaching license in the states included in the agreement upon meeting their license requirements.

The teacher education unit has been accredited by NCATE since 1975.

 

Admissions & Continuance Requirements for Candidates

Decisions regarding admission and continuance are made by the director of teacher education and the teacher education committee.  Admission or approval to continue in the teacher education program is not automatically granted upon completion of academic requirements.  If any deficiencies are noted in subject or pedagogical knowledge, communications or interpersonal skills, the director of teacher education may require candidates to remedy these deficiencies, which may include taking additional coursework, completing an additional practicum, or obtaining personal counseling.  Serious academic, disposition or other deficiencies preclude one to be admitted or continue in the teacher education program.  Candidates who have been denied admission or continuation in the program have the right to submit a formal appeal to the chairperson by the timeline delineated in the unit assessment system (Appendix B) using the Request for Appeal Form and the Candidate Appeal Checklist in which can be obtained through an email request to Ms. Kusnierczyk.

The teacher education committee can make three kinds of decisions at the time of application for admission:

  1. full admission (for candidates who meet all admission requirements)
  2. provisional admission (for candidates who do not meet all admission requirements but have the potential to do so (e.g., a slightly lower CORE test score or GPA))
  3. denial (for those candidates who do not meet the admission criteria

Candidates on provisional status need to meet all the requirements by the end of the provisional semester in order to stay in the program.  If requirements are not met by the deadline, the candidate is denied continuation in the program.  Each candidate is entitled to only one provisional and one probationary semester.

Admission

For admission to the program undergraduate candidates must:

  • Declare an education major in the School of Arts and Sciences
  • Submit passing scores on CORE which are:
    • Reading: 156
    • Writing: 162
    • Math: 150
  • Submit an application for teacher education, including personal statement in LiveText
  • Maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0
  • Maintain an education GPA of 3.0
  • Maintain a content area GPA of 3.0 (secondary education majors only)
  • Submit two letters of reference from professors in the Department of Education.  Secondary education candidates should submit one letter from a professor in education and one from a professor in their content specialization area.
  • Complete self-assessment forms in LiveText
    • disposition survey
    • technology survey
    • candidate profile form
  • Complete Language Proficiency Exam (secondary modern languages candidates only)
  • Obtain security clearance
  • Devise a long-term plan of studies with an academic advisor
  • Attend orientation session for prospective teacher education candidates

Continuance

After admission, the teacher education committee continues to monitor candidate performance.  If a candidate's performance falls below expectations, the candidate is placed on probation for a semester.  Program continuance may be contingent on additional coursework, field experiences, or use of resource services.  If the candidate does not meet all requirements by the end of the probationary semester, the candidate is denied continuance.  Each candidate is entitled to only one provisional and one probationary semester.

Continuance in the teacher education program is based on academic performance and demonstration of professional dispositions, such as field experience evaluations, disposition survey results, and GPA.  Graduate candidates need to obtain grades of B or better.  Graduate candidates may be eligible for program dismissal or probation after receipt of two "C" grades in any course.  Any candidate who is dismissed from the program has the right to appeal the decision using the Request for Appeal Form and the Candidate Appeal Checklist in LiveText.

For continuance in the teacher education program undergraduate candidates must:

  • Maintain an education GPA of 3.0
  • Maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0
  • Maintain a content area GPA of 3.0 (secondary education candidates only)
  • Obtain a grade of at least a C- in all courses required for state licensure.  If candidates receive a D in a course, they need to contact their adviser.
  • Obtain satisfactory evaluations in field experiences and disposition evaluations.
  • Exhibit professional and ethical behavior in field and course experiences.
  • Complete practicum experiences with documentation of hours spent in schools.
  • Complete all course specific assignments.
  • Maintain security clearance.

For admission to student teaching undergraduate candidates must:

  • Be fully accepted in the teacher education program in order to register for student teaching.  This includes having passing scores on the PRAXISTM I tests in reading, writing and mathematics and having taken the PRAXISTM II content area test (if DC has identified one)
  • Maintain an education GPA of 3.0
  • Maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0
  • Maintain a content area GPA of 3.0 (secondary education candidates only)
  • Obtain satisfactory evaluations in field experiences in disposition evaluations.
  • Exhibit professional and ethical behavior in field and course experiences.
  • Complete practicum experiences with documentation of hours spent in schools.
  • Complete all course specific assignments.
  • Submit student teaching application in LiveText.
  • Complete A&S Junior Audit.
  • Maintain security clearance.
  • Submit results of a negative TB Test.
  • Attend the orientation meeting for prospective student teachers.
  • Submit Content Area Course Record to program coordinator (secondary candidates only).  Complete Language Proficiency Exam (secondary modern languages candidates only).

Contact

Mimi Schuttloffel, Ph.D.
Chair, Department of Education
schuttloffel@cua.edu

Agnes Cave, Ph.D.
Director of Teacher Education
Coordinator of Elementary Education Program
cave@cua.edu

Kathryn Bojczyk, Ph.D
Coordinator of Early Childhood Education Program
bojczyk@cua.edu

John Convey Ph.D.
Coordinator of Secondary Education Program
convey@cua.edu

Elsie Neely
Director of Field Experience
neely@cua.edu

Elizabeth Montanaro, Ph.D.
Coordinator of Special Education Program
montanaroe@cua.edu

Carole Brown, Ed.D.
Coordinator of Early Childhood Special Education Program
brownc@cua.edu

Jennifer Kusnierczyk
Administrative Assistant of Teacher Education
kusnierczyk@cua.edu

Areas of Specialization

Early Childhood Education

 

 

The Early Childhood Education Program at CUA is listed as an NAEYC/NCATE Nationally Recognized Program

A concentration in early childhood education will prepare students to teach as certified professionals in early childhood settings.  This generally includes work with youngsters aged 3-8 (pre-kindergarten through 3rd grade), although the definition varies with state regulations.  This area is rapidly expanding as recent legislation and public awareness have resulted in an increased demand for quality education at earlier ages.  Teaching and other career opportunities are opening up in day care, administration, community outreach, and program development.

Course work is designed to integrate exposure to the theories, issues and methods of early childhood education with practical experiences in the field.  The dilemmas and decisions that educators in this area face are given special emphasis, such as whether to concentrate on the academic development of children or on their social, emotional, and physical needs.  Our goal is the development of a reflective mode of thinking that combines professional competence and social consciousness with an awareness of all elements of the teaching situation.  This program is structured to prepare individuals who are well-equipped for the important task of educating and providing for young children, thus laying the foundation for future development.

The bachelor's degree program in early childhood education has the same general structure as other B.A. programs at CUA.  Courses in the liberal arts are required in addition to the professional and general courses leading to certification.  The sequence of courses combines a strong liberal arts background, research and field-based professional preparation, a concern for computer literacy and technological competency, and a commitment to serving special needs children and multi-cultural classrooms.  Students are exposed to a variety of career and service opportunities in early childhood education.

Elementary Education

The Elementary Education Program at CUA is listed as an ACEI/NCATE Nationally Recognized Program

Candidates who wish to teach in classrooms that are largely self-contained (Grades 1-6) major in elementary education.  This area of specialization combines the required coursework with exposure to a variety of educational settings, different professionals in the field and a wide range of children a the elementary school level.  Candidates engage in field experiences that include observations, site visits, tutoring opportunities, two part-time practicums, and a full-time student teaching experience.  These are structured so that candidates have opportunities to apply what they learn in class to real teaching situations.

This concentration emphasizes the development of a reflective stance towards teaching in elementary settings.  The ability to independently reflect on teaching practice and educational contexts is essential at this level.  Elementary school teachers typically spend the work day in one room with the same group of students.  They are constantly engaged in student interactions, problem solving and decision making with limited support available from other professionals or resources.  This could result in isolated, routine and haphazard behavior.  Our goal is to prepare dynamic, creative, stimulating individuals who can overcome the institutional and occupational constraints that elementary school teachers face.

Studies in elementary education include the basic CUA general education requirements, professional education courses required by the certifying authorities in most states, and a teaching specialization.  General education requirements fall under three cognate areas: social sciences, math/natural sciences, and humanities/literature.  CUA has additional general education requirements in philosophy, religion, and foreign languages.  This program generally takes candidates eight semesters to complete.

Concentration in elementary education offers a combination of a strong liberal arts education, research and field-based professional preparation, a concern for computer literacy and technological awareness, and a commitment to serving special needs children and multi-cultural classrooms.

Secondary Education

Specializations in secondary education lead to certification at the middle school and high school level.  Candidates are introduced to a variety of philosophies and approaches to secondary education through coursework and field experiences and to a wide variety of students from diverse backgrounds.

Reflective teaching at the secondary level is important to ensure that students engage in maximal educational experiences as they prepare to enter adulthood.  Some crucial dilemmas are recognized, such as the nature of the curriculum and allocation of resources, time and materials.  Our goal is to prepare professional educators who are able to meet the challenges presented by a changing society while adhering to sound instructional practice.

Candidates who plan to teach in a departmentalized setting for grades 7-12 major in one of the following College of Arts and Sciences disciplines: English, History and Mathematics.

For detailed information about specific programs, contact the Coordinator of Secondary Education in the Department of Education Dr.John Convey and the academic department of the discipline in which you want to specialize.

Music Education

Prospective candidates interested in music education need to contact the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music.

Practical Experience

Field Experiences

A commitment to linking educational theory and research to instructional practice makes field experiences an important part of teacher preparation at CUA.  The program takes advantage of the unique character of the Washington, D.C. area, introducing candidates to a wide variety of schools.

On-Site Visitation of Elementary and Secondary Schools

Site visits are an important part of EDUC 251: Foundations of Education.  Sophomore candidates visit at least four elementary and secondary public and private schools.  The purpose of these visits is to give candidates the opportunity to learn how different types of schools are organized and to observe teachers working with students in a variety of teaching situations.  Candidates record their observations while touring school facilities and interacting with school professionals and students.  They prepare written reflections after each site visit focusing on the identification of specific instances related to the elements of the learning environment.  They use the three modes of reflection to discuss schooling dilemmas they observe and the implications of teachers' decisions for practice.

Tutorial Program

Sophomore candidates taking EDUC 271: Psychology of Education are required to participate in a tutorial program.  Candidates travel to neighborhood schools to provide remedial help for students primarily in mathematics and reading.  Tutors work with small groups or individual students on skills specified by the classroom teacher.  Candidates complete journal entries on the basis of tutoring interactions.  These assignments are turned in weekly after each session.  Candidates reflect on their own ability to integrate theory learned in class into instructional practice.

Practicum

Students do two semesters of practicum in their junior year.

Student Teaching

Students do one semester of student teaching in their senior year.

More specific information is given in the Student Teaching Handbook and in the Unit Assessment System.

Visiting Schools On-Site

Field and Clinical Experiences: Early Childhood and Elementary Education Programs

Courses (credit hours) Field Experiences / Age / Grade
Beginning Coursework - After admission to CUA but before admission to the Teacher Education Program
EDUC 101: Introduction to Teaching (1cr)(optional) Candidates visit a school for half a day and write about the school's philosophy as they see it expressed in the behavior of the principal, teachers, support staff, and students.  School selection is based on the projected area of interest for each candidate with consideration given to grade and school type.
EDUC 251: Foundations of Education (3cr) Candidates complete four hours of observation in three different educational institutions (such as charter schools, under-resourced public elementary schools, and Catholic high schools) to look for evidence of the school's aims, goals, and functions of schooling.  Candidates write about these observations using the CUA conceptual framework as a guide, focusing on educational dilemmas.  Candidates are expected to actively reflect on their own educational experiences and how they compare to the learning environments observed.
EDUC 261: Human Growth and Development (3cr) Candidates complete three hours in an inclusion program serving developing and developmentally delayed elementary-aged children.  The purpose is to observe two students who are at different developmental ages and to compare their cognitive, social, linguistic and motor skills.  This time-sampling observation assignment helps candidates learn to look for a full range of abilities at these ages and reflect on the implications for teachers in the class using CUA's conceptual framework, more specifically, components of the decision making process.
EDUC 271: Psychology of Education (3cr) Candidates complete a minimum of 15 hours of tutoring in an under-resourced elementary school.  The purpose for candidates is to (1) document their attempts to help students who are having difficulty learning to read, write, or do math, (2) connect learning theories to a particular child's performance, and (3) reflect upon their experiences using CUA's conceptual framework (emphasizing the elements of the learning environment).  Seven reflective tutoring journal assignments are used for this assessment.
Middle Coursework - After Admission to and during Continuance in the Teacher Education Program but before Student Teaching

EDUC 313: Classroom Management for Regular and Special Needs Children (3cr)
EDUC 312: Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood and Elementary School (3cr)
Literature in Curriculum (3cr)

Candidates spend two half days a week (six hours a week) for an entire semester (1st professional semester) while taking these courses.  During this time they assist the teacher and practice writing, implementing, and evaluating lessons with small groups of students.  The purpose is to gain experience in teaching in a setting where the regular classroom teacher is present.  Elementary education candidates are placed in one of two blocks of grades (lower elementary: 1st-3rd) grades and upper elementary: 4th-6th grades) for this experience in an urban or suburban private, public or charter school.  Early childhood candidates are placed in either Pre-K/K or 1st-3rd grades.  Type of school and grade block differ in the candidates' next practicum placement.  Candidates learn how to write lesson plans during the junior year as well as a mini action research paper that prepares candidates for the capstone action research paper as evidence for 1st-6th grade impact.  Grades from these methods courses are also used to provide data on candidates' content and pedagogical content knowledge.
EDUC 321: Teaching Early Childhood & Elementary Science, Health & Physical Education (PreK-6th grade) (3cr)
EDUC 320: Teaching Early Childhood & Elementary Social Studies (PreK-6th grade) (3cr)
EDUC 323: Methods and Materials in Modern Elementary Mathematics (3cr)
EDUC 324: Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary School (3cr)
Candidates spend one full and one half-day (nine hours/week) for the entire semester (2nd professional semester) in field experiences while taking these courses.  They practice developing, implementing, and evaluating lesson plans and an integrated thematic unit for their practicum classrooms.  Type of school and grade block differ from previous placement experience.  Grades from these methods courses are also used to provide data on candidates' content and pedagogical content knowledge.  Cooperating teachers evaluate candidates using both a general practicum evaluation and the unit's disposition survey that is used throughout the candidates' course of study.
EDUC 342: Models in Early Childhood Education (3cr) (ECE only) Completed in conjunction with a practicum experience described above or with student teaching.  Additional requirements include observations in three program types including a Reggio Emilia program for 3-6 year olds, a kindergarten at a public charter school, and a first grade at a Catholic elementary school.   The purpose is to explore early childhood teacher roles and responsibilities and to see how different philosophies of education are translated into programs for young children.
EDUC 341: Curriculum and Strategies in Early Childhood Education (3cr) (ECE only) Completed in conjunction with student teaching or a practicum experience.  Early childhood candidates select one child at their field site for intensive study and practice using authentic assessment strategies and curriculum development.  They also develop an integrated project designed to gain experience in planning a one-week integrated unit for young children (3-4, 4-5, or 5-6 year olds) and describe how they communicate their ideas with parents.
 Final Coursework -  After Admission to Student Teaching
 EDUC 400, 411, 412, 413: Supervised Internship in Elementary (12cr)
Or
EDUC 400, 401, 402, 403: Supervised Internship in Early Childhood (12cr)
14 weeks of student teaching in PreK-3rd or 1st-6th grade under the guidance of an experienced teacher, assuming complete responsibility for the class for at least four weeks.  Candidates complete an action research project in conjunction with this internship and are evaluated by their cooperating teacher and university supervisor.  Candidates must document their reflections on this experience and the whole program.  Key assessment - action research paper, student teaching evaluation, electronic portfolio.
 EDUC 600: Supervised Teaching for Classroom Teachers (4cr) Candidates who are currently teaching attend the student teaching seminar and complete capstone requirements (action research, electronic portfolio) in their classrooms.  Candidates submit documentation of successful teaching, and they are observed by CUA faculty supervisors.  Candidates with recent, prior teaching experience may be eligible to take EDUC 600.

 

Field and Clinical Experiences: Secondary Education Program

Courses (credit hours)  Field Experiences / Age / Grade
 Beginning Course - After admission to CUA but before admission to the Teacher Education Program
EDUC 101: Introduction to Teaching (1cr) (optional) Candidates visit a school for half a day and write about the school's philosophy as they see it expressed in the behavior of the principal, teachers, support staff, and students.  School selection is based on the projected area of interest for each candidate with consideration given to grade and school type.
EDUC 251: Foundations of Education (3cr) Candidates complete four hours of observation in three different educational institutions (such as charter schools, under-resourced public elementary schools, and Catholic high schools) to look for evidence of the school's aims, goals, and functions of schooling.  Candidates write about these observations using the CUA conceptual framework as a guide, focusing on educational dilemmas.  Candidates are expected to actively reflect on their own educational experiences and how they compare to the learning environments observed.
EDUC 271: Psychology of Education (3cr) Candidates complete a minimum of 15 hours of tutoring in an under-resourced elementary school.  The purpose for candidates is to (1) document their attempts to help students who are having difficulty learning to read, write, or do math, (2) connect learning theories to a particular child's performance, and (3) reflect upon their experiences using CUA's conceptual framework (emphasizing the elements of the learning environment).  Seven reflective tutoring journal assignments are used for this assessment.
  Middle Coursework - After Admission to and during Continuance in the Teacher Education Program but before Student Teaching
EDUC 386: Curriculum and Methods in Adolescent Education (3cr) Observation in content area classrooms.  A series of observation papers are assigned requiring use of the conceptual framework to consider how secondary school learning environments reflect the needs of diverse, adolescent learners.  A final paper focuses on discussion of dilemmas inherent in the learning environment and development of a philosophy of education.
xxx: Methods of Teaching in the Content Area (3cr) In content-specific methods courses (English, math, social studies) candidates observe in secondary classrooms and complete assignments that focus reflection on the elements of the learning environment, professional standards, and a philosophy of teaching.  Candidates in art and foreign language programs observe in elementary school and secondary school settings.
Final Coursework - After Admission to Student Teaching
EDUC 461, 462, 463: Supervised Internship in Secondary Education (12cr) 14 weeks of student teaching in 7th-12th grade under the guidance of an experienced cooperating teacher assuming complete responsibility for the class for at least four weeks.  Candidates complete an action research project in conjunction with this internship and are evaluated by their cooperating teacher and university supervisor.  Candidates must document their reflections on this experience and the whole program. Students are also required to create an electronic portfolio as part of their student teaching experience.

 

Practicum

A weekly practicum is required of undergraduate juniors concentrating in elementary or early childhood education.  In the first professional semester candidates intern for two mornings a week in the same classroom.  In the second professional semester, candidates intern for one full day and one half day a week.  Concurrent class work in major methods courses are carried out in the practicum setting.

Throughout the year candidates practice newly learned methods in a comfortable setting.  Problem solving and reflective analysis of classroom situations are also encouraged.  Secondary education candidates are required to complete a series of eight observations and interview assignments in an area high school prior to student teaching.  In these assignments, compiled in a secondary education Field Experiences Packet, candidates analyze the school and community context, the curriculum, instructional and management strategies, etc.  They keep a journal of entries on each assignment which they discuss with the Secondary Education faculty coordinator.  Candidates are also encouraged to assist with classroom instruction.

Student Teaching

Student teaching is a critical event in the teacher education program at CUA.  This experience provides a setting for the beginning teacher to use the professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions acquired in previous coursework.  During this time the pre-service teacher continues to develop a number of intellectual, personal, and professional orientations needed for successful teaching.  The student teacher takes responsibility for fulfilling the roles of a professional teacher: content specialist, learning diagnostician, group manager, evaluator, and curriculum developer.  At CUA, student teaching is a fulltime 14-week supervised field experience.  The cooperating teacher and university supervisor work closely with the student teacher to improve teaching performance while encouraging self-evaluation and reflection.  Supervision provided by the cooperating teacher and university supervisor encourages a pattern of self-initiated professional growth.  The responsibility for the success of this venture is shared by each member of the essential triad.

The following objectives have been identified for the student teaching experience:

  1. To give each student teacher an adequate and effective series of learning experiences in preparation for the teaching profession including the formulation and implementation of daily, weekly and long-range lesson plans, and the selection, preparation and implementation of varied instructional materials.
  2. To develop student teachers' abilities to identify problems and difficulties in their own teaching situations and to use professional knowledge and resources to overcome them.
  3. To determine if the student teacher has qualities associated with good teaching: an interest in teaching and love of children, emotional balance and self-knowledge, good interpersonal skills, intellectual and physical energy, breadth of interest, professional appearance and behavior.
  4. To develop student teachers' reflective skills and dispositions enabling them to examine the elements of the learning environment and components of decision making and to make reasoned judgments about the educational dilemmas they encounter.

Candidates should submit the Student Teaching Application at the LiveText website by the second week of the semester prior to the student teaching semester.

Approval to student teach is granted following full acceptance in the teacher education program, and assessment of current academic status, program standing, successful performance in prior field experiences, and the completion of appropriate PRAXIS II content area tests prior to application.  This PRAXIS II requirement is not applicable to early childhood education majors.

The approval decision is made by the director of teacher education with input from other faculty and field supervisors.  More specific information is given in the Student Teaching Handbook.  This handbook is distributed to all student teachers, university supervisors, and cooperating teachers prior to the student teaching semester.

Please note: State Boards of Education, including the District of  Columbia Board of Education, may refuse to grant a teaching license to an applicant convicted, as an adult, of an act of immoral conduct contributing to the delinquency of a child, or a felony involving moral turpitude or other similar crimes.

Assessment & Exit Requirements

Comprehensive Exams & ARP

All candidates must pass a capstone experience to exit the teacher education program.  The purpose of this exercise is to give candidates a chance to integrate the information and skills they have acquired in coursework and field experiences.  This exercise also allows the Department of Education to maintain and monitor the high standards and expectations set for program graduates.  Although screening devices and student supports are built into the program at every level, comprehensive examinations ensure that graduating candidates are ready to begin their professional career as educators.

Action Research Paper

All teacher education candidates write an action research paper as their capstone experience in their student teaching semester.  Candidates write a summary of their problem-solving activities which becomes the basis for further study.  Candidates are required to complete a review of the literature related to the topic and to integrate experience and literature in formulating personal philosophy of education.  Faculty support and feedback are important parts of this process.  Faculty work with candidates throughout the project.  Feedback and suggestions are given during the student teaching seminar and at individual meetings between faculty and candidates.  Candidates are given one hour of academic credit for this key assessment as part of the student teaching experience.  Secondary education candidates complete this project and are also required to take the comprehensive examination in their area of specialization.

Exit Requirements for Candidates

For exit and graduation, undergraduate candidates must:

  • Pass A&S Graduation Audit
  • Successfully complete all coursework required for state licensure with no grade lower than a C-
  • Successfully complete a range of field experiences with related course assignments, including a fourteen-week student teaching placement or other internship.  Candidates involved in student teaching are required to complete an action research project as a part of this field experience.
  • Receive a passing grade on the comprehensive examination.  Early childhood and elementary education candidates complete the action research paper in lieu of the comprehensive exam.  The action research project template and the matching scoring guide are included in LiveText.  Secondary candidates also complete an action research paper in the student teaching seminar, and take a comprehensive exam in their content area A&S departments.
  • Complete alumni survey

For teaching licensure undergraduate candidates must:

  • Pass required PRAXISTM II exams as outlined by the District of Columbia.
  • Complete an electronic portfolio and successfully present it to a panel of faculty.
  • Meet the minimum benchmarks on all key assessments.
  • Submit a completed license application (along with a $50 money order made out to "DC Treasurer") to the director of teacher education
  • Submit a criminal background check or FBI check with license application

After employment undergraduate candidates must:

  • Complete alumni survey to evaluate the quality of CUA's teacher education program
  • Return employer survey of candidate's job performance

Licensure

All of CUA's teacher education programs are accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and state-approved by the District of Columbia.

Reciprocity

Because the District of Columbia has signed a reciprocity agreement with 43 other states, candidates who apply to the District for their standard teaching license will find ti easier to apply for a license with those other states.  The following states are included in the reciprocity agreement:

 Alabama  Illinois  Nevada  Rhode Island
 Arkansas  Indiana  New Hampshire  South Carolina
 California  Kentucky  New Jersey  Tennessee
 Colorado  Louisiana  New Mexico  Texas
 Connecticut  Maine  New York  Utah
 Delaware  Maryland  North Carolina  Vermont
 Department of Defense Schools  Massachusetts  North Dakota  Virginia
 Florida  Michigan  Ohio  Washington
 Georgia  Mississippi  Oklahoma  West Virginia
 Hawaii  Montana  Oregon  Wyoming
 Idaho  Nebraska  Pennsylvania  

 

Early in their programs candidates should contact individual state jurisdictions where they are seeking employment for specific courses and tests necessary for full licensure.

PLEASE NOTE: Completing a teacher preparation program does not automatically result in teaching licensure.  Candidates must make formal application to each state in which they seek a license and obtain passing scores on both Praxis I and II for a teaching license for most states.  Information on Praxis I and Praxis II is available from the academic advisor, education faculty, and at the ETS website.

The best way to be licensed in any of these states is to apply first for a teaching license in the District of Columbia and then submit an application to the other state(s) in which licensure is sought.  District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) applications for licensure are available in the Teacher Education Office, 218 O'Boyle Hall.  The completed application should be returned to the Teacher Education Office with a $50 money order or cashier's check payable to "DC Treasurer" and a criminal background check sealed in an envelope.  All program requirements must be completed and the Office of the Registrar must confirm graduation from the NCATE accredited/State approved program before the application can be submitted by The CUA Certification Officer (the Director of Teacher Education) to DCPS.  The Office of the Registrar should be contacted about when graduation will be verified.

Education Studies

Introduction

EDUCATING ISN'T ONLY DONE IN CLASSROOMS!

Are you interested in being involved in education, but not interested in being a classroom teacher?  Do the requirements for obtaining a teaching certificate seem too confining for your interests?

Consider the program in education studies offered through the Department of Education at The Catholic University of America.

  • People do learn outside of classrooms.
  • Many not-for-profit organizations have as their central mission to educate the public.
  • Museums, zoos, and libraries spend millions on their educational efforts.
  • Businesses educate, and a teaching certificate is generally not a prerequisite for a job in business.
  • The mass media is the largest and most influential educational platform in the modern world.

Educational institutions, businesses and government agencies at home and abroad are looking for people with educational knowledge, strong in second language skills and possessed of an easy familiarity with other cultures.  No teaching certificate required.

If education and flexibility are words that help define your future, consider majoring in education studies at The Catholic University of America.

See how far an education studies major can take you.

Overview

This individually designed program does not lead to teacher certification.  Instead it serves students who want to apply in settings not requiring the teaching certificate the skills they developed while pursuing a degree in Education.  It is the most flexible undergraduate major offered by the Department of Education at The Catholic University of America.  Each major usually enrolls in one or more field experiences that serve as culminating activities directed toward preparing Education Studies majors for entry into the world of work.

education studies students explore administrative, curricular, economic, legal, philosophical, psychological and social issues in education that may be applied to jobs in any of the following arenas:

  • The public sector, local, state or federal governments.
  • The private, for-profit sector, including industries & trade associations.
  • The public or private, not-for-profit sector, hospitals, museums, foundations, associations, or charitable organizations.

This concentration teaches students who want to work with or for children in non-school settings.  It prepares students to understand the ways schools function and to gain first hand knowledge of how outside agencies may enhance or impede the work of schools.  Students majoring in education studies gain knowledge enabling them to be informed citizens and parents who understand how to interact constructively with schools.  Through its several foci, the program in education studies also teaches students how to enter, manage, or begin businesses related to education; or how to design educational products; or how to obtain employment in educationally related mass media, including public relations, advertising or print journalism.  Education studies students can focus on education issues relevant to the work place, or the U.S. justice system, or those of concern to special populations, or those germane to second language education and cultural diversity.  This latter focus might be of interest to students who want to apply their education abroad, or assist students whose first language is not English.  Or education studies students may add to their education base an exploration of the complex issues surrounding violent and nonviolent approaches to resolving conflicts and issues associated with the study of peace, justice, and world order.

Program Requirements

Admission Procedures:

  • Students must apply to major in education studies.
    • The student must be admitted to the School of Arts and Sciences.
    • The student must be in good standing, not be on academic probation for any reason prior to admission to this program, and maintain a GPA of 2.3.
  • An interview with the program coordinator, Dr. Rona Frederick, is generally required.  Dr. Frederick may be contacted by email: frederick@cua.edu.

Course Selection Principles:

  • 40 three-credit hour courses are required for graduation.
  • At least 12 education courses must be taken.
  • Five courses form the foundational or core requirements.  They are:
    • EDUC 251 Foundations of Education
    • EDUC 261 Human Growth and Development
    • EDUC 271 Psychology of Education
    • EDUC 503 Human Relations and Interpersonal Communications (recommended)
      • or EDUC 421 Interpersonal Communication, Consultation and the Process of Change
    • XXX A course in research methods (recommended SOC 202 or PSY 350 (prerequisite of PSY 350 is PSY 201))
  • At least one special focus area must be completed.
  • This program ordinarily culminates in one or more practicums or internships (EDUC 441 or 442).
  • Advising about course selection will take into consideration the student's needs and career goals.  It is the advisor's job to help each Education Studies major identify a suitable career and to design a program of studies that leads to the career.

General Education Choices

EDUC 101 Introduction to Teaching

PHYS 240 Sun and Earth: Concepts and Connections

EDUC 251 Foundations of Education

EDUC 261 Human Growth and Development

EDUC 271 Psychology of Education

EDUC 422 Race, Class, Gender and Disability in Education

EDUC 425 Psychology of Learning for Diverse Populations

EDUC 530 Language and Literacy in Multicultural Contexts

EDUC 531 Language and Literacy Development in Children with Disabilities

EDUC 535 Current Trends in Ethical and Legal Issues in Special Education

EDUC 421 Interpersonal Communication, Consultation and the Process of Change

EDUC541 Mental Health Principles

EDUC 542 Principles and Practices of Counseling

EDUC 546 Coping with life Crises

EDUC 372 Understanding Learning Disabilities

EDUC 554 Instructional Design

EDUC 313 Classroom Management for Regular and Special Needs Children (Pre-K - 6)(Students should be concurrently enrolled in EDUC 561)

EDUC 441 Practicum in Non-School Educational Settings

EDUC 442 Internship in Non-School Educational Settings

EDUC 312 Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School

EDUC 311 Children's Literature in the Curriculum

EDUC 578 International and Multicultural Education

EDUC 381 Education Diverse Learners

EDUC 382 Reading in the Content Areas:  Learning to Learn from Text

EDUC 342 Models in Early Childhood Education

Practicum in a Non-School Setting

COURSE DESCRIPTION

A field experience in which a student spends 150 clock hours during a semester observing and working on-site in a non-school setting that has educational implications.  Students are under the direction of on-site personnel.  Assignments include journal keeping and a site-based research paper.

PREREQUISITES: EDUC 251, 261, 271, 503, or 421, and a research methods course.

ELIGIBILITY: Education Studies concentrators.

APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Each student confers with the Education Studies coordinator and registers for EDUC 441 no later than the pre-registration period of the previous semester.  Because of the time it takes to locate and confirm a placement site, students may not register for this course at the beginning of the semester in which they expect to take it.  Many practicum sites require the student to apply months in advance in order to obtain a field placement.
  • Each student must discuss possible placements with the Program's site placement coordinator at the beginning of the semester prior to the semester during the student hopes to take EDUC 441.
  • The program's site placement coordinator will help the student identify a suitable agency for placement and make the initial institutional contact.
  • After conferring with the program's site placement coordinator, the student makes an official, but preliminary contact with the identified agency.
  • NOTE: There must be mutual agreement among the agency contact person, the student and the program's site placement coordinator about the appropriateness of the placement before the placement is made final.
  • After placement is negotiated, the student must assume responsibility and fulfill requirements for clearances specified by the agency (health, security, transportation, etc.). The student assumes the financial costs involved in fulfilling these requirements, including providing one's own transportation and obtaining liability insurance through Catholic University.
  • NOTE:  Failure on the part of the student to complete all aspects of this process by the beginning of the semester will result in the student being required to drop this course.

EDUCATION 441: Requirements:

Clock hours on site:  A total of 150 clock hours are required.  This amounts to more than 10 hours a week for one semester.  This scheduling of the hours on-site will be at the discretion of the student and the on-site supervisor.  Students are expected to be punctual, log in and report to the on-site supervisor each assigned day, and to sign out at the end of each day.  The time spent on site is to be looked upon with the same seriousness as one would look upon a paying job.

On-campus obligation:  Students will be in contact with the program's site coordinator on a regular basis through individual and group, formal and informal conferences.  The specific arrangements and times will be made at the beginning of the practicum experience each semester.

Assignments:  Students are required to keep a weekly journal which will be submitted bi-weekly throughout the semester to the program's site coordinator.  Students will also develop a site-based research paper of at least 25 pages dealing with some problem or aspect of the practicum experience.  Students are expected to be reflective about their practice.  At the end of the semester and the student will prepare an oral presentation of the research paper and present it to all Education Studies' majors in a culminating general session.  The paper itself should be submitted to the program's site coordinator, typed, double-spaced, following a recognized format, and containing both references and an appropriate bibliography (a minimum of 25 citations of bibliographic references is required), two weeks before the end of the semester in which the student is enrolled for EDUC 441.

Final grade:  This will be based on the evaluations of the on-site supervisor and the program's site coordinator; the quality of the student's written work; and the quality of the participation in the individual and group, formal and informal conferences.  The program's site coordinator will keep in contact with the on-site supervisor and oversee, with the on-site supervisor, an evaluation of the student at mid-term and at the end of the semester.

All Education Studies majors must take and pass a senior comprehensive examination.  The usual format for comprehensive examinations for education studies is a follows: students are to be given six questions five weeks before the last day to withdraw from courses and be required to answer five of these take-home questions.  Answers are to be completed by the student without assistance from others, though the student may consult library sources in answering each of the questions.  The answer to each question is to be typed, double-spaced, following a recognized format.  The answer to each question should be 7 or 8 pages in length and should be appropriately referenced.  Each question will be read by one reader for accuracy, adequacy, and cogency.  It will be graded following the department's usual grading system for comprehensive examinations.  In order to pass, the student must obtain a total score of 15 from the sum of the means obtained on each of the five questions.

A student who fails the comprehensive examination may be granted the privilege of a re-examination during one of the subsequent annual periods assigned for senior comprehensives.  Passing the senior comprehensive examination is a requirement for receiving a bachelor's degree in EDUCATION STUDIES from Catholic University.

Education 442: Internship in Non-School Settings.

The requirements for this course are similar to those for EDUC 441 which is a prerequisite for enrolling in EDUC 442.

 

 

Concentration Areas

Education & Business

This focus can lead to jobs in educational publishing, marketing, advertising or resource management, or as a trainer, manager, public relations worker or director, or state education agency field worker, or as an advertising representative or product representative.  It can also give students grounding in operating their own educational business.

ACCT 305 Introduction to Accounting

ECON 323 Introduction to Statistics I (prerequisite: MATH 111)

or PSY 322 Introductory Statistics

or SOC 301 Statistical Analysis for Social Science I

MGT 423 Management Theory and Practice

MGT 426 Financial Management

Plus two or more of the following:

ECON 101 Principles of Macroeconomics

ECON 102 Principles of Microeconomics

MGT 510   Leadership and Organization

MGT 527   Human Resource Information Systems and

MGT 530   Communications

MGT 543  Management of Human Resources

MGT 545  Labor Management Relations

MGT 546  Marketing Management

MGT 547  Marketing Research Methods

MGT 557  Consumer Marketing

MGT 560  Product and Brand Management

MGT 564  Business and Ecommerce Management

MGT 568  Benefits and Compensation Management

MGT 572 Microcomputer Applications in Business (Note the prerequisite)

MGT 573  Entrepreneurship and Capital Venturing Global and Strategic Human Resource Management

 

Or with the permission of the Dean:

MBU 100 Introduction to Business

MBU 160 Public Relations

MBU 205 Contemporary Marketing

MBU 360 Marketing and Sales Promotion

MBU 468 Human Resources, Health, Safety and Security

MBU 490 Entrepreneurship

 

Education & Computers and Instructional Design

This focus can lead to jobs in educational software development, instructional design, desktop publishing, or records management, or as an educational materials developer or consultant, sales manager, or advertising manager.

CSC 104 Introduction to Computers I

CSC 105 Introduction to Computers II

Plus four or more of the following:

CSC 113 Computer Programming I

PSY 222 Psychology and Technology

CSC 497 Computer Security and Privacy

PSY 536 Human-Computer Interaction

EDUC 554 Instructional Design

 

Or with the permission of the Dean:

MIS 135 Desktop Publishing

MIS 230 Local Area Networks

MIS 240 Management Information Systems

MIS 260 Multimedia Authoring/Software Development

MIS 321 Operating Systems

MIS 325 Project Management

 

 

Education & Information Management

CSC 104 & 105  Introduction to Computers and Programming

CSC 113  Computer Programming I

Plus three or more of the following:

PSY 222  Psychology and Technology

MGT 527  Human Resource Info Systems & Communications

LSC 551   Organization of Information

LSC 553   Information Sources and Services

LSC 555   Information Systems in Libraries & Information

LSC 557   Centers

EDUC 554 Libraries and Information in Society Instructional Design

Or with the permission of the Dean:

MBU 320  Intro to Records and Info Management

MBU 322  Records Technology

MBU 323  Archives Management

MBU 325  Electronic Records Management

Education & Mass Media

This focus can lead to jobs as an editor, reporter, writer, media specialist, public relations worker, advertising staff member, script writer, speaker, education consultant, TV or radio teacher, public opinion researcher, critic or talent.

MEDIA 201  Introduction to Media Studies

MEDIA 394  Signs and Symbols in American Life

Plus four or more of the following:

ART 101            Fundamentals of Design

ART 231            Intro to Digital Art

ART 260            Multimedia Design and Development

ART 309 or 317  Introduction to Photography

ART 315 or 316  Web Page Design

POL 317            American Public Opinion

POL 320            Comparative World Media

MEDIA 303        Media and Rhetoric

MEDIA 330        Intro to Journalism

MEDIA 350        American Cinema, American Culture

MEDIA 381        Photography in the Digital Age

MGT 527           Human Resource Info Systems and Communications

Or with the permission of the Dean:

MBU 160         Public Relations

MME 352        Media Post Production

MME 446        Mass Media and Society

 

Education & School, Family and Society

Six or more of the following:

SOC 206         Marriage and the Family

PSY 226         Close Interpersonal Relationships

SOC 321         Adolescence in America

SOC 345        Sociology of Sports

EDUC 221      Health/Physical Education in the Elementary School

ART 352         Art in the Museums

PSY 419         Psychology of Adolescence

PSY 503         Social History and Psychological Development

SOC 514         Sex & Society

SOC 524         Minority Relations

EDUC 422       Race, Class, Gender & Disability in Education

EDUC 530       Language and Literacy in Multicultural Contexts

SOC 530         Family Problems

SOC 527         Aging and the Family

EDUC 541       Mental Health Principles

EDUC 542       Principles and Practices of Counseling Services

SOC 556         Lies My Teacher told Me: Everything Your High School                           History Text Book Got Wrong

LSC 557          Libraries and Information in Society

EDUC 311       Children's Literature in the Curriculum

EDUC 578       International and Multicultural Education

EDUC 342       Models in Early Childhood Education

Education & Issues in the Work Place

This focus can lead to jobs as employee assistance consultants, trainers or specialists, program developer, human resource managers, human relations workers, customer relations workers or directors.

Six or more of the following:

SOC 324          Succeeding in America

SOC 342          Occupations and Professions

PSY 362          Psychology, Work & Law

PSY 420          Social and Personality Development

EDUC 422        Race, Class, Gender and Disability

SOC 524          Minority Relations

PSY 525          Psychology of Trauma

MGT 530          Management of Human Resources (Prereq. MGT 423)

SOC 538

EDUC 539        Counseling Woman and Culturally Diverse

EDUC 541        Populations

EDUC 542        Career Development and Vocational Counseling

EDUC 554        Mental Health Principles

EDUC 546        Principles and Practices of Counseling

MGT 573          Instructional Design

                       Coping With Life Crises

SOC 562         Global & Strategic Human Resources Mgmt. (Prereq. MGT 423)

                      Formal Organizations

Or with the permission of the Dean:

MBU 160         Public Relations

MBU 351         Managerial Leadership

MBU 352        Personnel Management

MBU 453        Labor Relations

Education & Special Populations

This focus can lead to jobs as a recreation director, playground supervisor, camp instructor or director, community education worker, educator in special community projects, childcare educator or specialist, youth worker, case worker, half-way house worker or director, YMCA or YWCA worker or director.

Six or more of the following:

PSY 232       Psychology of Stress and Coping

SSS 302       Social Welfare Policy I

SOC 312       Minority Relations

EDUC 321     Health/Physical Education in the Elem

PSY 418       School

PSY 434       Abnormal Child Psychology

EDUC 422     Brain and Behavior

SOC 528       Race, Class, Gender and Disability

EDUC 425     Social Stratification & Mobility in America

EDUC 530     Psychology of Learning for Diverse Populations

EDUC 531     Language & Literacy in Multicultural Contexts

EDUC 535     Lang. & Literacy Development in Children with Disabilities

EDUC 541     Current Trends in Ethical & Legal Issues in Special Education

SSS 554       Homelessness: Individual & Societal Considerations  

EDUC 313      Mental Health Principles

EDUC 301

EDUC 320

EDUC 578

EDUC 381

Education & Social Justice

This focus can lead to jobs in the juvenile justice system, the general court system or in insurance.  Jobs include case worker, probation and parole officers, human relations consultants, police officers, or program administrators, researchers, or evaluators in the criminal justice system.

Six or more of the following:

SOC 101           Introduction to Sociology

SOC 102           Social Problems

SOC 205           Sociology of Crime

SOC 208           Sociology of Delinquency

PHIL 309           Theories of Ethics

PHIL 311           Contemporary Moral Issues

SOC 312           Minority Relations

SOC 321           Adolescence in America

PHIL 403           Morality and Law

SOC 424           Conflict and Conflict Resolution

SOC 524           Minority Relations

EDUC 535         Current Trends in Ethical and Legal Issues in Special Educ.

EDUC 541         Mental Health Principles

SOC 571           Social Deviance

Education & Peace and World Order Studies

This focus can lead to jobs as Peace Corps program developers or workers, AID staff workers, DOD staff workers, negotiators, community planning and development specialists, or educators in special community projects.

The School of Arts and Sciences offers an interdisciplinary undergraduate sub-concentration in Peace and World Order Studies.  EDUCATION STUDIES majors may pursue this sub-concentration as their focus.  Students interested in applying must do so by beginning of their junior year.  They must take three core courses as early in their career as possible:

POL 226  Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies

SOC 331  Social Movements and Collective Behavior

REL 416   War, Peace, and Revolution: Christian Perspectives

In addition, students choose three electives from one of the three tracks and complete a senior thesis in consultation with the director of the Peace and World Order Studies Program.  This thesis may serve as a substitute for EDUC 560: Practicum in Non-School Educational Settings.  For a complete listing of eligible courses, students should consult the director of the Peace and World Order Studies Program.

Contact

Dr. Rona Frederick
Director of Education Studies Program
229 O'Boyle Hall
frederick@cua.edu
202-319-6694

Ms. Jennifer Kusnierczyk
Administrative Assistant, Office of Teacher Education
218 O'Boyle Hall
kusnierczyk@cua.edu
202-319-5800