The Catholic University of America

Graduate Programs

Overview

 

The Department of Education at The Catholic University of America is under the School of Arts and Sciences, the largest school in the university. The department has 8 full-time, tenure-track faculty, two clinical faculty members, two research faculty members, one adjunct faculty member and one director of field experiences. The faculty is committed to pursuing excellence in instruction, research, and service functions.

The department boasts extremely small class sizes - typically 15 students/class at the undergraduate level and less than 10 at the graduate level. Student enrollment numbers about 200, with approximately equal numbers of graduate and undergraduate students. The department also supports the training of about 65 students who are preparing for careers as secondary-school teachers.

The department offers the following degrees:

  • Master of Arts (M.A.)

    • Special Education
    • Secondary Education (English, Social Studies, Mathematics)
    • Early Childhood/Special Education
  • Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

    • Educational Psychology (Admission suspended)
    • Catholic Educational Leadership (CELPS)
  • Advanced Graduate Certificate

    • Catholic Educational Leadership (CELPS)


Additionally, the Department includes the Professional Development Workshops and Institutes, which are designed for teachers, counselors, administrators, diagnosticians, psychologists, and other school personnel to gain credits toward recertification.

More information can be found in the following:

Graduate Teacher Certification Program (GTCP)

So you want to be a Teacher?

This program is for you if:

  • Your goal is to become a certified special education or secondary education teacher and you have a college degree

  • you are a career changer who wants to become a teacher

  • you want to graduate from a fully accredited program that is both nationally and state accredited and includes certification reciprocity with 43 states, plus Department of Defense Schools

  • You have a provisional teaching license and want to be fully certified

Special Education GTCP

Emphasis

The GTCP in Special Education currently emphasizes preparation for consultative and teaching roles in public and private early childhood, elementary or middle/intermediate/junior high school educational settings.

The GTCP sequence in special education provides knowledge, theory, and practice in the development and education of children with mental retardation, learning disabilities, behavioral, speech and language difficulties, and related areas of need.  The program has a standard requirement of 30 credit hours as described below.

It is expected that candidates will come to the program with solid preparation in special education.  Candidates will be prepared to act in consultative roles and to foster inclusion of children with special needs within the general curriculum in both private schools and public schools.  The program has existing partnerships with the Catholic schools of the Archdiocese of Washington, the public schools of both the District of Columbia and Prince George's County in Maryland, the Southern Maryland Higher Education Center and several specialty and charter schools, which provide a variety of choices for practical experiences.  Candidates who are currently certified to teach and who successfully complete the program listed below are eligible for special education certification in the District of Columbia and, by reciprocity, in 44 other jurisdictions.  Candidates who do not currently hold any teaching certificate may have more requirements to be eligible for certification.  The Catholic University of America does not itself grant certification, as certification is the prerogative of the state in which one plans to teach.

 

Special Skills

Candidates in the GTCP in special education are expected to develop expertise in assessment and cognitive learning strategies, as well as skills in fostering and managing change in school environments, advocation for children with special needs, and consulting and supporting parents and other teachers.  Candidates are encouraged to approach their study and future work reflectively, considering the instructional, ethical, empathic, interpretative, and practical dimensions and consequences of their behaviors.  The GTCP in special education at Catholic University is designed to lead candidates from a child-focused to a systems-focused perspective.

Recommended Course Work for the MA (36 hours)

EDUC 522     Race, Class, Gender and Disability in Education

EDUC 525     Psychology of Learning for Diverse Populations

EDUC 531     Language and Literacy Development of Children and Disabilities

EDUC 532     Practicum in Modification and Adaptability of Curriculum and Instruction for Exceptional Children

EDUC 533     Field Experience in Assessment

EDUC 534     Current Trends in Ethical and Legal Issues in Special Education

EDUC 521     Interpersonal Communication, Consultation, Collaboration and the Process of Systems Change

EDUC 581     Educating Diverse Learners

EDUC 635     Psychological Measurement

Electives

EDUC 513     Classroom Management for Regular and Special Needs Children

EDUC 615     School and Community Relations

EDUC 639     Human Growth and Development

EDUC 702     Advanced Foundations of Education

The GTCP in special education can be completed within two calendar years of part-time study.  A part-time program of study, however, requires full-time availability during six weeks each summer, usually from the last week of June through the first week of August.

Requirements

Because of their non-degree status, GTCP students do not have to submit GRE or MAT scores for admission but must submit passing scores on the Praxis I tests in reading, writing, and mathematics.  GTCP candidates do not have to take comprehensive examinations or produce a thesis, but they must pass the Praxis II test in the core knowledge of special education before becoming eligible for certification.  The coursework for certification candidates is approximately that same as that for MA candidates, one difference being that GTCP candidates substitute two electives for Education 699 and 702, two courses required in the M.A. program.

GTCP candidates may apply for admission to the MA program at any time during their course of study but will have to be accepted into the M.A. program and complete all MA requirements.  If you are interested in more information on the M.A. program in special education please see the Masters in Education tab.

Secondary Education GTCP

Specializations in secondary education lead to certification at the high school level.  secondary education is for those who wish to be certified to teach students in grades 7-12 in one academic area.  Candidates are introduced to a variety of philosophies and approaches to secondary education through coursework and field experiences and to a wide variety of students from diverse backgrounds.

Reflective teaching at the secondary level is important to ensure that students engage in maximal educational experiences as they prepare to enter adulthood.  Some crucial dilemmas are recognized, such as the nature of the curriculum and allocation of resources, times and materials.  Our goal is to prepare professional educators who are able to meet the challenges presented by a changing society, while adhering to sound instructional practice.

GTCP- Secondary Education

Sample Program of Studies

Fall

EDUC ___  Subject Area Methods Course

EDUC 582  Reading in the Content Area

EDUC 702  Advanced Foundations in Education

Spring

EDUC 525  Psychology of Learning for Diverse Learners

EDUC 586  Curriculum and Methods of Adolescent Education

Fall

EDUC 561, 562, 563  Supervised Internship and Seminar

Requirements

Because of their non-degree status, GTCP candidates do not have to submit GRE or MAT scores for admission,  but must submit passing scores on the Praxis I tests in reading (172), writing (171), and mathematics (174) with a composite score of 527.  GTCP candidates do not have to take comprehensive examinations or produce a thesis, but they must pass the Praxis II test in the core knowledge of secondary education before becoming eligible for certification.  The coursework for certification candidates is approximately the same as that for MA candidates, one difference being that GTCP candidates substitute two electives for Education 699 and 702, two courses required in the MA program.

GTCP candidates may apply for admission to the MA program at any time during their course of study but will have to be accepted into the MA program and complete all MA requirements.  If you are interested in more information on the MA program in Teacher Education, Secondary Education please see the Masters in Education tab.

Admission Requirements

  • Call 202-319-5057 for an application or visit Admissions to apply online.
  • Complete and submit the application form with a non-refundable $55.00 application fee.
  • Submit official college transcripts of all previous course work.
  • Submit two letters of recommendation.
  • Submit passing Praxis I Series scores in
    • Reading: 172
    • Writing: 171
    • Math: 174
    • Cumulative: 527
      • Visit ETS for registration information or call 1-900-853-6773.  Request that your Praxis results be sent directly to The Catholic University of America.
  • Write a statement of goals that includes why you wish to be a teacher.
  • Submit application and all supporting documents to:

The Catholic University of America
Office of Graduate Student Services
110 McMahon Hall, Cardinal Station
Washington, DC 20064

Masters Programs (MA)

Introduction

The Department of Education in the School of Arts and Sciences offers a master of arts in education.  The M.A. program consists of 30 to 60 semester hours of post-baccalaureate coursework plus the successful completion of a research paper, and comprehensive examinations.  Students who select the option of working toward professional certification will spend more than the 30-hour minimum completing coursework.

Requirements

The amount of time required to complete the degree program will depend on the number of credit hours needed.  In general, a 30 to 36 hour program requires one to two years for full-times students.  A 60-hour program requires about three years for full-time students.  Entering students with previous graduate experience may transfer a maximum of six semester hours of graduate credit.  Credit for core courses is usually not transferred.

Special Education

Emphasis

The special education program emphasizes preparation for consultative and teaching roles in public and private K-12 educational settings.

If there is insufficient time to apply as a degree-seeking candidate, those who hold a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university may apply as a non-degree candidate, and complete a full application during the semester while taking courses.  Interested applicants should, at least, come to the first class meetings.

Why receive a M.A. in Special Education?

The M.A. sequence provides knowledge, theory, and practice in the development and education of children with intellectual impairments, learning disabilities, behavioral, speech and language difficulties, and related areas of need.  The program has a standard requirement of 36 credit hours as described below.

It is expected that students will come to the program with solid preparation in early childhood, elementary and/or secondary education.  Students will be prepared to act in consultative roles and to foster inclusion of children with special needs within the general curriculum in both private schools and public schools.  The program has existing partnerships with the Catholic schools of the Archdiocese of Washington, the public schools of both the District of Columbia and Prince George's County in Maryland, and several specialty and charter schools, which provide a variety of choices for practical experiences.  Students who are currently certified to teach and who successfully complete the program listed below should be eligible for special education certification in the District of Columbia and, by reciprocity, in most other jurisdictions.  Students who do not currently hold any teaching certificate may require more course work than is listed below in order to obtain a special education certificate but may become eligible for certification by completing our special education programs.  The Catholic University of America does not itself grant certification; this is a prerogative of the state in which one plans to teach.

 

Special Skills

Students in the special education program are expected to develop expertise in assessment and cognitive learning strategies, as well as skills in fostering and managing change in school environments, advocating for children with special needs, and consulting and supporting parents and other teachers.  Students are encouraged to approach their study and future work reflectively, considering the instructional, ethical, empathic, interpretative, and practical dimensions and consequences of their behaviors.  The special education program at Catholic University is designed to lead students from a child-focused to a system-focused perspective.

Recommended Course Work for the MA (36 hours)

EDUC 522     Race, Class, Gender and Disability in Education

EDUC 525     Psychology of Learning for Diverse Populations

EDUC 531     Language and Literacy Development of Children with Disabilities

EDUC 532     Practicum in Modification and Adaptability of Curriculum and Instruction for Exceptional Children

EDUC 533     Field Experience in Assessment

EDUC 534     Field Experience:  Collaboration, Consultation and Systems Change

EDUC 535     Current Trends in Ethical and Legal Issues in Special Education

EDUC 521     Interpersonal Communication, Consultation, Collaboration and the Process of Systems Change

EDUC 581     Educating Diverse Learners

EDUC 635     Psychological Measurement

EDUC 699     Introduction to Education Research

EDUC 702     Advanced Foundation of Education

Electives

EDUC 513     Classroom Management for Regular and Special Needs Children

EDUC 615     Governance and Community Relations

EDUC 639     Human Growth and Development

EDUC 669     Diagnosing and Remediating Reading Problems in the Classroom

The Special Education Program can be completed within two calendar years of part-time study.  A part-time program of study, however, requires full-time availability during six weeks each summer (usually from the last week of June through the first week of August).

 

Requirements

Admission to the master's program includes acceptable scores on either the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT), and an undergraduate grade point average of 2.70/4.0, three letters of recommendation and a personal interview, in addition to the usual application and fees.

During the student's master's program, each student must certify that he or she has satisfactorily passed the Praxis I tests in reading, writing and mathematics.  In order to be certified, the student must also pass the Praxis II test in the core knowledge of special education.  Master's candidates must also pass comprehensive examinations and produce an acceptable research paper in order to graduate.

Non-degree certification candidates (GTCP) do not have to submit GRE or MAT scores for admission, but must submit passing scores on the Praxis I tests in reading, writing and mathematics.  GTCP students do not have to take comprehensive examinations or produce a thesis, but they must pass the Praxis II test in the core knowledge of special education before becoming eligible for certification.  The coursework for certification students is approximately the same as that for M.A. candidates except that GTCP students will substitute two electives for Education 699 and 702.

GTCP students may apply for admission to the MA program after having successfully passed 5 graduate courses during their course of study at Catholic University, but will have to be accepted into the MA program and complete all M.A. requirements.  Once accepted into the MA program, all coursework required for the GTCP will be accepted toward the MA requirements if the candidate received a grade of "B" or better in these courses.

Secondary Education

Emphasis

The emphasis in this area is on providing the student with the professional education coursework needed for state licensure in secondary education.  This program presents teaching as reflective practice.  By developing a reflective, problem-solving orientation toward education, graduates of these programs should be empowered to critically examine their own actions and the context of these actions for the purpose of a more deliberative mode of professional activity.  The outcome should be self-directed teachers who use professional knowledge to actively, persistently and carefully improve their practice.

The Secondary Education sequence prepares middle school and high school teachers.  It is a 42-hour sequence including student teaching.  Students in secondary education must also fulfill specific state requirements concerning a subject area of specialization.

Special Skills

The teacher certification program provides students with information about the teaching processes, including learning theory and teaching methodology; interpersonal skills required in the teaching/learning process; knowledge of curriculum theory and design based on individual assessments; competency in the development and use of instructional materials; and opportunities to apply theory through directed practicum experience.

Individuals interested in secondary education should contact Dr. Joan Thompson, the coordinator for the secondary education graduate program, in order to discuss their needs and to determine whether the department's offerings can accommodate those needs.  These programs are NCATE accredited and approved by the District of Columbia, which has a reciprocity agreement with 43 states.

 

Details of Program

The Catholic University of America is committed to a strong and vibrant teacher education program, not a teacher training program concerned solely with developing basic teaching skills.  While we recognize the need for students to demonstrate a basic level of teaching competence, we view that achievement as only the beginning of their professional preparation.  We are more concerned with the development of critical, reflective minds and in morally grounded, self-motivated action.  The sections below describe the program designed to foster these qualities.

  • Philosophy & Conceptual Framework

  • Admissions Requirements For Students

  • Exit Requirements For Students

  • Certification Information

  • Secondary Education

  • Comprehensive Exams

  • Practicum

  • Student Teaching

 

Early Childhood/Special Education

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 (Pictured from the left: Back: Amy Hegner, Dr. Merylann Schuttloffel, Rosa Moraes; Front: Lachelle Story, Penelope Miller, Consuelo Lara, Jennifer Gee, Leticia Dyett, Audrey Walker, Dr. Shavaun Wall, Dr. Carole Brown)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Pictured from the left: Dr. Shavaun Wall, Doris Obregon, Christy Webster, Lisa Morenoff (Special Ed.), Dr. Merylann Schuttloffel, Dr. Carole Brown)

Recently we cheerfully honored the first students to successfully complete the Early Childhood Special Education Master’s degree at The Catholic University of America. The program began in January of 2011. Ten Early Childhood Special Education graduates from the first cohort completed the program to assist and educate young children, including those with developmental delays and disabilities, and to support their families in schools in the District of Columbia. These students received tuition funding from the US Department of Education, The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services under Grant #H32K100116.


Department wins $1.1 Million Grant for Early Childhood/ Special Education Master's Program

MA in early childhood education, with endorsement in special education
Emphasis - Brochure
 

This MA program blends knowledge and strategies from early childhood education and special education. Through coursework and field placements, the program prepares graduates to assist and educate all young children, including those with developmental delays and disabilities, and to support their families. Concurrently the program prepares graduates to work with children who may have cultural and linguistic differences and/or are from low-income families. Students are encouraged to approach their study and future work reflectively, considering the dimensions and consequences of their professional decisions.
 

Why receive a MA in Early Childhood Education with endorsement in Special Education?
 

The program equips students with scientifically-verified practices, skills and knowledge needed to improve developmental, academic and functional outcomes for children from birth through age 8 with and without developmental delays and disabilities. The MA sequence provides rigorous academic training and outstanding field experiences. The program has a standard requirement of 36 credit hours as described below.
The program is offered in collaboration with the Office of the State Superintendent (OSSE) in D.C. and the District of Columbia Public Schools and has partnerships with a broad array of agencies and schools including CentroNia, a bilingual, multicultural public charter school and service provider for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, the Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy School of Catholic Charities’ Early Childhood Program, and E.W. Stokes Public Charter School, a multi-lingual, multicultural school, and the Auburn School. Students have a variety of choices for practical experiences, including home-based early intervention programs, Early Head Start, early care and education sites, and preschool through primary grades in elementary schools.
 

Students who successfully complete the program listed below should be eligible for certification in early childhood education and endorsement in special education in the District of Columbia and, by reciprocity, in most other jurisdictions. The Catholic University of America Teacher Education Officer certifies graduates for teaching by contract with OSSE of the District of Columbia. Successful graduates will be certified to teach prek-3rd grade. Currently, certification for teaching children from birth – 3 is not available in D.C.
 

Graduates are prepared for employment in early childhood special education positions in early intervention, early elementary grades K – 3, early childhood special education, and early childhood care and education settings serving infants, toddlers and young children including public and private schools and programs.
Course Work for the MA (36 hours; 30 hours if 6 hours are approved for transfer credit)
 

EDUC 639: Human Growth and Development
EDUC 581: Educating Diverse Learners
EDUC 531: Literacy Instruction and Engagement for Diverse Learners
EDUC 532: Modification and Adaptation of Curriculum and Instruction of the
The Exceptional Individual
EDUC 525: Psychology of Learning for Diverse Learners
EDUC 699: Introduction to Educational Research
EDUC 572 Language and Cultural Issues in Bilingual Education
EDUC 635: Psychological Measurement
EDUC 702: Advanced Foundations of Education
EDUC 533: Field Experience in Assessment
EDUC 573: Family Support using a Strengths-Based Model
EDUC 575: Supervised Internship: Early Childhood Section

 

The MA Program in Early Childhood Education with Special Education Endorsement can be completed within two calendar years of part-time study – typically in five semesters including summer study. To obtain experiences outside of one’s place of employment, the part-time program of study requires full-time availability during six weeks each summer (usually from the last week of June through the first week of August).

 

Requirements
 

Admission to the master's program includes acceptable scores on Praxis I and either the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) and undergraduate grade point average of 2.75/4.0, three letters of recommendation and a personal interview, in addition to the usual application and fees.


By the end of the student's MA program, he or she must pass OSSE required Praxis tests including Praxis I, Praxis II tests in the core knowledge of early childhood (0022/5022)* and Principles in Learning and Teaching in Early Childhood (0621/5621).  Master's candidates must also pass comprehensive examinations and produce two research papers in order to graduate.
[See also Graduate Teacher Certification Program (GTCP) for non-degree certification]

* this requirement may change to (0691/5691) in October 2013 according to OSSE.

 

Literacy, Language and Technology

We are currently not accepting applications to this program until further notice.

The M.A. in Literacy, Language and Technology offers a high-quality education option to recent CUA Department of Education graduates and local teachers (i.e., public, charter, and Catholic school teachers) who are seeking an additional teaching endorsement as a literacy professional and/or those professionals seeking state licensure as a Reading Specialist/Literacy Coach. The K-12 literacy professional would assume leadership positions including reading specialist, literacy coach, reading resource teacher and/or would provide enhanced literacy instruction in the elementary, special education, or secondary classroom. This MA will prepare literacy professionals to develop a strong foundation in reading, writing, and language development and to implement instructional strategies that incorporate technology-rich practices to address the literacy needs of students across the curriculum. The program emphasizes literacy instruction for culturally and linguistically diverse readers.


Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the masters program in Literacy, Language and Technology, graduate students will be able to:
• Demonstrate knowledge of the foundations of language, reading and writing
• Use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction for all learners including readers from culturally and linguistically diverse populations
• Implement and use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction both at the individual level and the school-wide level
• Create technologically-rich literate environments that foster engagement in reading, writing and oral communication
• Develop and lead the implementation of school-wide literacy programs
• Design and implement high quality, long-term professional development programs in literacy for paraprofessionals, teachers, administrators, parents, and other community members at the local and state levels
Program of Study

General CORE
EDUC 525 Psychology of Learning for Diverse Populations
EDUC 699 Introduction to Educational Research
EDUC 702 Advanced Foundations of Education

Literacy CORE
EDUC 602 Psychology of Reading
EDUC 670 Language Development and Emergent Literacy
EDUC 531 Literacy and Language Instruction for Diverse Readers
EDUC 668 Literacy Assessment: Diagnosis, Evaluation and Remediation
EDUC 530 Literature and Language in Multicultural Contexts
OR
EDUC 582 Reading in the Content Areas
EDUC 603 Literacy Clinical Field Experience
EDUC 604 Seminar: The Role of the Literacy Professional

For licensure as a Reading Specialist in DC and MD, candidates must:
• Pass Praxis I and Praxis II (Reading Specialist)
• Teach for 3 years

Requirements

Admission to the master's program including acceptable scores on either the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT), and undergraduate grade point average of 2.70/4.0, three letters of recommendation and a personal interview, in addition to the usual application and fees.
 

Doctoral Programs (Ph.D.)

Introduction

The Department of Education in the School of Arts and Sciences offers a Ph.D. in education.  The doctoral program consists of minimum of 61 semester hours of post-baccalaureate coursework plus the successful completion of a comprehensive examination and a dissertation and the satisfaction of the university residency requirement.  All doctoral students are required to complete 15 hours of study in general education courses and an additional 15 hours of study in research/statistics.  The remaining coursework is completed in a specialty area.  The department offers a specialty area of educational psychology.

The department's approach to doctoral training is mentor-oriented.  Typically, a student identifies a faculty member from one of the specialties with whom the student will work.  Together the mentor and the student plan a program of studies.  These programs are individualized, and sometimes interdisciplinary but remain with the broad area of educational psychology.  Generally, the completion of all degree requirements takes three to four years for full time students and longer for part-time students.  Students who already have a master's degree often enter the doctoral program.  For these students, transfer credits and/or waivers of requirements are decided in consultation with the student's adviser and the department chair.

These are not state-accredited licensure programs.  Further coursework may be required to meet licensure requirements in your state.

Educational Psychology

We are currently not accepting applications to this program until further notice.

 

This specialty is broadly concerned with the areas of learning, instruction and evaluation of different aged populations.  Educational psychology graduates can be prepared to assume positions as college and university professors, educational researchers, researchers for government and industry, statistics and research methodology consultants, instructional designers and developers, program evaluators, and directors of research for school systems.  An emphasis is placed on preparing competent researchers.

Students in educational psychology take 30 to 36 semester hours of specialty coursework.  The design of this sequence can be individualized based on the interests and background of the student.  The types of sequences that are often selected include courses in the areas of cognition and instruction, research and evaluation, and human development.  To illustrate, a student interested in cognition and instruction would take a series of courses in cognitive psychology, computing, instructional design and development, and independent study/directed research.  Some of these would be taken within the department and others would come from relevant disciplines.  Similarly, a student interested in human development might take courses that cover the psychological, sociological and educational aspects of development, as well as independent study/directed research.

 

Instructions for Admission to Doctoral Study

The following documents are required before the admissions committee will review your application:

A completed Graduate Application Form.

Scores from the general Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT).

Transcripts from all previous undergraduate and graduate work.

One professional letter of recommendation.

Two academic letters of recommendation.

A one-to-two-page statement of goals.

After credentials have been reviewed, the department chair may request an interview.

 

Overview of Doctoral Program

The doctoral program consists of a minimum of 61 semester hours of post-baccalaureate coursework plus the successful completion of a comprehensive examination and a dissertation and the satisfaction of the university residency requirement.  All doctoral students are required to complete 15 hours of study in general education courses and an additional 15 hours of study in research/statistics.  The remaining hours consist of educational psychology and educational administration/policy studies courses.

The department's approach to doctoral training is mentor oriented.  Typically, a student identifies a faculty member from one of the specialties with whom the student will work.  Together, the mentor and the student plan a program of studies.  These programs are individualized, and sometimes interdisciplinary but remain within the broad areas of educational psychology and educational administration/policy studies.  Generally, the completion of all degree requirements takes three to four years for full time students and longer for part-time students.  Students who already have a master's degree often enter the doctoral program.  For these students, transfer credits and/or waivers of requirements are decided in consultation with the student's advisor and the department chair.

CUA students specialize in one of the two general areas, educational psychology or educational administration/policy studies.

This is not a state-accredited licensure program.  Further coursework may be required to meet licensure requirements in your state.

 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Requirement

Core Requirements

Required courses fall into two categories, core and statistics/research methodology.  Five of the following courses are required of all students in the doctoral program.

The following three are required:

EDUC 652     Psychology of Learning: Implications for Instruction (3)

EDUC 699     Introduction to Educational Research (3)

EDUC 701     Philosophical Foundations of Education (3)

or EDUC 702   Advanced Foundations of Education (3)

TWO of the following are required:

EDUC 639     Human Development (3)

EDUC 521     Human Relations & Interpersonal Communication Skills (3)

EDUC 765     Principles of Curriculum (3)

EDUC 637     Curriculum and Program Evaluation (3)

Statistics/Research Methodology Courses

The following courses are also required:

EDUC 633     Introduction to Statistics and Data Processing (4)

EDUC 733     Experimental Design (3)

ONE of the following are required:

EDUC 737     Applied Regression Analysis (3)

or SOC 604   Intermediate Social Statistics (3)

 

Other Requirements

In addition to the core courses, students must satisfy additional requirements.  First, students complete a program of studies in one of the two specialty areas.  A Program of Studies is a projection of the student's series of courses.  It must be approved by the student's academic advisor and the department chair, and it must be filed in the student's departmental records before the end of the first year of study.  Approval of  a projected program does not obligate the university to offer all the courses listed.

The second requirement is the successful completion of a written comprehensive examination.  This exam is typically taken after course work is completed and the language requirement is satisfied.

Third, students are required to complete and defend a written dissertation.  The dissertation is viewed as a major research project and is expected to be of publishable quality.  The approval process for a dissertation topic is described in the University's Dissertation Thesis Handbook.

Catholic Education Leadership Program (CELP)

Introduction

The graduate program in Catholic Educational Leadership and Policy Studies offered through the Department of Education at The Catholic University of America is designed to respond to the nationwide need to prepare future Catholic educational leaders.  The program focuses on the academic, professional and spiritual development to prepare for service in leadership positions as Catholic school superintendents, vicars for education, central office personnel and principals.  The program, which offers the Master of Arts, the Advanced Graduate Certificate, or the Doctor of Philosophy, includes coursework and related activities that integrate the academic, professional and ecclesiastical perspectives that CUA can uniquely provide.  The Catholic Educational Leadership program does not lead to state licensure.

Summer Program

Designed to meet the academic needs of full-time professional educators, courses are offered during a five-week summer session for three consecutive summers, with supplementary field assignments during the school year.  Opportunities also are available for students to study full-time during the academic year.

Philosophy

The Catholic Educational Leadership and Policy Studies program affirms the Church's ministry of education by:

  • Promoting the knowledge necessary for creating a Catholic educational community, rooted in sound academic performance and integrated with a lived faith.

  • Providing the requisite leadership formation opportunities for engaging in the ministry challenges of "teaching as Jesus did"

  • Assisting in developing the vision that enhances Catholic education as a vehicle for sanctification within the Catholic Church and the nation.

Admission Requirements

  • Submit an application indicating an interest in being admitted to either the doctoral program or the advanced graduate certificate program in Catholic Education Leadership.  Applicants may apply for admission online at: http://admissions.cua.edu.

  • Candidates seeking admission to the doctoral program or the advanced graduate certificate in Catholic Education Leadership (CELPS) should possess a master's degree from an accredited institution in educational leadership or a related field, and submit for review and evaluation GRE or MAT scores, and official transcripts of all previous academic work.

  • Submit three strongly supportive letters of recommendation, at least one of which should be from a person familiar with the applicant's academic production and ability to do doctoral work; others may be from an immediate supervisor or others familiar with the applicant's professional work.

  • Submit a statement of goals that demonstrates motivation, is well written, and fits with Department's programs.  This detailed statement will indicate specifically why the applicant is seeking the degree and what areas of research they would like to explore in more depth.  This statement should also include any information from the applicant's background that will help the admissions committee evaluate the applicant's potential for advanced graduate study.

  • In addition, an interview is required with the program director or designee.

  • For candidate with at least ten years of documented administrative experience as a diocesan official (e.g. superintendent, associate superintendent, school principal) or comparable administrative role, GRE and MAT scores may be waived and, upon review and approval by the Program's Coordinator, up to 24 graduate credits from an accredited institution may be transferred regardless of the date the credits were earned.

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Catholic School Leadership (only through ADW cohorts) - 30 credits including:

  • Departmental Core (9 credits)

  • Catholic Education Core (6 credits)

  • Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (15 credits)

  • Research project

  • Comprehensive examinations

Advanced Graduate certificate in Catholic Diocesan Leadership:

  • M.A. plus 19 credits (25 credits if M.A. is not in Catholic Educational Administration or Educational Leadership and Policy Studies)

Doctor of Philosophy in Catholic Education Leadership (Catholic Educational Leadership M.A. plus 41 credits, including):

  • Catholic Education Core (12 credits)

  • Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (13 credits)

  • Research Core (16 credits)

  • Doctoral comprehensive examinations

  • Dissertation

Courses

Research

EDUC 633 Intro Statistics for Behavioral Science

EDUC 637 Curriculum and Program Evaluation

EDUC 733 Experimental Design

Catholic Core

EDUC 704 History/Mission/Practice - Catholic Education

EDUC 707 Contemporary Issues in Catholic Educational Policy and Practice

EDUC 715 Building Faith Community

EDUC 860 Research on Catholic Schools

Leadership and Policy Studies

EDUC 615 Governance & Community Relations

EDUC 712 Fiscal Issues & Policy in Education

EDUC 751 Educational Administration Lyceum

EDUC 720 Emerging Leadership Theory

EDUC 850 Interdisciplinary Seminar on Research

Financial Aid

Catholic University offers 50% tuition reduction for Catholic school educators.  In addition, students accepted into the program in Catholic Education Leadership are eligible for additional university scholarships and assistantships, which are awarded on a competitive basis.  A CUA Financial Aid Application and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must be submitted in order to request need-based aid.  A separate application for merit-based aid is not required.

Contact

Merylann "Mimi" Schuttloffel, Ph.D.
Chair/Program Director
schuttloffel@cua.edu
Phone: 202-319-5805
Fax: 202-319-5815

Leonard DeFiore, Ed.D.
Research Assistant Professor
defiore@cua.edu
Phone: 202-319-6397

 

Graduate Admissions

Requirements for admission to graduate study in the university are published in the General Information section of the Graduate Announcements.  Requirements specific to the Department of Education can be found in the Education Department section of the Graduate Announcements.  Briefly, applicants for graduate study for an M.A. or Ph.D. in the Department of Education are required to submit:
 

  • A completed graduate application form with a $55 nonrefundable application fee.  The application is available in the Office of Admissions and the Office of Financial Aid.  The application may also be completed on-line.

  • Official scores from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or from the Miller Analogies Test (MAT).  (The GRE is required for those students who with to apply for scholarships or financial aid.)

  • Three letters of recommendation (two from academic sources commenting on the applicant's ability to do graduate work, and one from a professional source commenting on the applicant's past and/or potential professional abilities.)

  • A one-or-two-page statement of goals which includes a discussion of why the student is applying to the department at CUA.

  • Official transcripts of previous graduate and undergraduate work.

  • International students must submit TOEFL scores.



Completed application and supporting documents should be submitted to:

Office of Graduate Admissions
The Catholic University of America
McMahon Hall
Washington, D.C. 20064

A more detailed description of these requirements can be found in the Graduate Announcements.  An interview may be requested by the chair of the department, but is not always necessary.  The university maintains a rolling admissions policy, however, for university scholarship consideration, all application credentials should be submitted by Feb. 1 prior to the fall semester.  Applications are reviewed by a departmental admissions committee and recommendations are forwarded to the associate dean for graduate studies in the School of Arts & Sciences.